A First Step for Pep

High School Begins New Tradition

Cheerleaders+lead+the+crowd+of+freshmen+at+the+first+pep+rally+in+the+new+school.+

Cheerleaders lead the crowd of freshmen at the first pep rally in the new school.

Madison Harris , Staff Writer

Northmont High School had its first pep rally since the mid 90s. It took place in the Thunderdome, on Thursday, October 6.

There had been no pep rallies at the old high school because the size of the gym was too small. It became too dangerous for everyone.

“Finally we have a place for the students to fit everyone in and it’s not crowded, so everyone can enjoy the pep rally,” said Ms. Robin Spiller, Athletic Director.

According to Spiller, one of the goals of organizing the pep rally was to create a positive school attitude.

“This year’s pep rally went great. It was a lot of fun and I’m glad that I got to be a part of it,” said freshman Nadeen Abouzahra.

Students came down to the gym 4th period. Each Fall sport was introduced, as the members of each team walked across the gym floor. The event included an obstacle course where a senior girl from each Fall sport competed against a senior boy. An enormous “Spirit Stick” was also awarded to the class that cheered the loudest; the seniors won, followed closely by the juniors. Head football coach Mr. Tony Broering thanked the crowd for their support of all the athletic programs.

“The obstacle course was very exciting, hearing everyone cheering, but I do suck at basketball,” said senior Abigail Spirk, a member of the varsity girls soccer team who competed in the obstacle course. One of the stations, much to Spirk’s dismay, was making a basket.

“I really enjoyed everyone coming together to cheer. Also, the obstacle course was fun and hilarious to watch,” said sophomore Kayla Beireis.

Many students enjoyed the pep rally and wished it had been longer.

“I wish that the pep rally was longer than one period. The teams were rushed out and it felt kind of rushed,” said freshman Payton Runyon.

The pep rally was a collaborative effort on the part of senior leaders, the school board, and Spiller.